Integration & Anti-Racism

We work in partnership with a range of other organisations to promote integration initiatives, including the business community, unions, statutory agencies, migrant groups and the local community. We collaborate with other organisations to keep integration and anti-racism on the political agenda and to progress policy and practice at the national level. Anti-racism is an important part of our integration strategy.


Integration Working Group (IWG)

The Limerick Integration Working Group (IWG) was established in 2007 to bring together bodies working with or on behalf of migrants, minorities and the wider community, and to facilitate information sharing, strategy development (see Integration Plan below) and cooperation.

The IWG is co-chaired by Doras Luimní and the Jesuit Refugee Service.

LIWG option 3 adjusted

Membership of the Group includes An Garda Síochána, Ballyhoura Development Ltd., Citizens Information Board, City Community and Voluntary Forum, Limerick City AES, County Limerick VEC, Department of Education and Science (Mid-West), Department of Social Protection, Doras Luimní (Joint Chair), Employment Services DSP, Health Service Executive, Integration Centre, Jesuit Refugee Service Ireland (Joint Chair), Limerick City & County Council, Limerick Filipino Community, Limerick Latvian Activity Centre, Limerick Volunteer Centre, New Communities Partnership, PAUL Partnership, University of Limerick and West Limerick Resources.

Integration Plan 2013 – 2016

towards-intercultural-limerick-2013-2016Towards Intercultural Limerick: Limerick City and County Integration Plan 2013-16 was developed by the IWG. Building on the progress achieved under the 2010-12 Plan, it seeks to take the next steps towards the development of Limerick as a truly welcoming, inclusive and intercultural region. The 2013 – 2016 Integration Plan for Limerick is available here.

Each year, a report is produced to map progress in reaching the agreed aims. Progress report are available to download here.


Intercultural Cities

icc mapDoras Luimní is leading the way for Limerick to become an Intercultural City as part of a European Council and European Commission funded programme known as Intercultural Cities.  The Intercultural Cities initiative, which officially welcomed Limerick as a member in November 2014, aims at stimulating new ideas and practices concerning the integration of migrants and minorities.

Doras Luimní are working closely with other cities around the world to promote a greater awareness of the positive role diversity can play in the development of a city. More about the programme can be found at www.coe.int/interculturalcities


antirumours logoAnti-Rumours

The anti-rumours campaign aims to dispel the widespread myths and misconceptions around the topic of immigration and migrant integration, by providing evidence-based answers and utilising social networks to spread the message of the campaign far and wide. The anti-rumours project is the first action of Limerick’s Intercultural Cities programme.

As part of the campaign, Doras Luimní provided free training to a team of anti-rumours advocates who were given the necessary tools to carry out their own projects and workshops which challenge the most common myths. From June 2014 to June 2016, over 1,000 people participated in our workshops across Limerick and Ireland.

Full details of all resources developed under this campaign are available here: Anti-Rumours

Top 5 Myths of Migration

5 myhts
A short information booklet detailing the top 5 myths of migration and outlining key statistics to help you challenge these rumours. Topics include the economy; social welfare; asylum seekers; integration and the infamous “free buggies”.

Download: 5 Myths of Migration_Booklet

Training Resource Pack

anti rumours training pack

The Training Resource Pack was designed to assist community and youth workers with an interest in addressing anti-racism issues with their groups. The training resource is a useful compilation of activities and worksheets for ages 12+ and includes topics such as stereotyping, power, and refugee protection.

Download: Training Resource Pack

  • Detailed information and further resources can be found here.

Anti-Racism

ireport logoAnti-racism is an important part of our integration strategy. Doras is an active member of the Irish Network Against Racism (ENAR Ireland) which is currently campaigning for the introduction of policies and legislation to combat racism and hate crime.

Local, national and European research has identified significant levels of racism in Ireland. However, reporting of racism is extremely low and Irish law does not define racist or related hate offences as specific offences. We promote reporting and recording by encouraging anyone affected by any form of racism or discrimination to make a formal complaint to the Gardaí, utilising a third-party reporting mechanism (www.ireport.ie) and offering advice, information and support.

Irish Network Against Racism (ENAR Ireland)

love_not_hate_croped_funaAt the national level we are campaigning for improved structures, policies and laws. We coordinate with other organisations around the country as members of the Irish Network Against Racism (ENAR Ireland).

We support the ENAR Ireland campaign calling for the introduction of Hate crime legislation in Ireland by enacting the Criminal Law (Hate Crime) Bill. Enacting this legislation send a strong message of support to our ethnic minority communities and would help Ireland to meet its EU and international obligations.

For more information on the #Love Not Hate campaign, visit www.enarireland.org

To show your support for the campaign, sign the petition.


 treateddifferentlycoverRacism in Limerick

Doras Luimní research on the prevalence of racism and discrimination highlighted that 80% of our service-users in Limerick had experienced racism more than once. Download the full report here: Treated Differently


European research on Racism in Ireland

  • The European Commission Against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI) has urged Ireland to strengthen protections against racism and racial discrimination. It’s most recent Report on Ireland details the steps needed to achieve this, including raising awareness about how to racist incidents, improved measures for monitoring and combating discrimination in employment, the establishment of an independent authority to deal with cases of discrimination in the provision of goods and services, and ratification of Protocol No. 12 to the European Convention on Human Rights on the general prohibition of discrimination.
  • The EU-MIDIS Report Minorities as Victims of Crime found that 26% of the Sub-Saharan Africans surveyed in Ireland reported that they had experienced at least one incident of assault, threat or serious harassment with a perceived racial motivation in the previous 12 months. These findings are supported Irish data which found that people from non-White ethnic backgrounds experienced the highest rates of discrimination at 29% of those surveyed.
  • Issues around reporting and recording of racist incidents are addressed in Making Hate Crimes Visible in the European Union: Acknowledging Victims’ Rights, a report by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.